The Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University

This hip-hop event is a dance party of music along with words musicked by Mike Ladd and Jean Grae followed by Q and A orchestrated by Professor Farah Jasmine Griffin. All in the spirit of the ancient improvising poet (singer/dancer?) called Homer and the modernist improvising painter, Romare Bearden. Dancing shoes recommended.

Time: 8:00 p.m.

How universal are the two themes of Romare Bearden’s Black Odyssey--art and life as improvisation, and the urge, need, and desire to return home?  Do these concepts apply to scientific research?  What has science to say about improvisation and the creative process?  This panel brings together eminent scientists and musicians to discuss these issues.  The evening will explore what recent neuroscience research can tell us about creativity, how scientific research can be improvisational, and whether creativity in the arts and in the sciences really differ after all.

 

Time: 6:30...

Columbia to Explore Romare Bearden's A Black Odyssey

A traveling Smithsonian exhibition, Romare Bearden: A Black Odyssey, * made its final stop at Columbia’s Wallach Gallery in November. Centered around collages based on Homer’s Odyssey by the celebrated African American artist Romare Bearden (1911-1988) and curated by Robert O’Meally, Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English and Comparative Literature, the exhibition is the focal point of a unique yearlong, University-wide exploration of Bearden’s iconic work. Departments and schools, students and faculty across Columbia, from the Core Curriculum to the Global Centers, are engaging in an array of public programs, including lectures and conferences, jazz and spoken word performances, and other special events on and off campus that will continue through the Spring of 2015.

For updates and to register for events please visit www.columbia.edu/bearden. Watch this Video by the Columbia News Video Team for more information about this exciting project.

 

*Romare Bearden: A Black Odyssey is organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service in cooperation with the Romare Bearden Foundation and Estate and DC Moore Gallery. The exhibition and its related educational resources are supported by a grant from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation.